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Sommeliers' Choice: a New Bordeaux

Table 301's Beverage Director, Aimee Mahar tells us why Richard Betts' Saint Glinglin is approachable, sophisticated, and delicious.

Aimee Mahar began her career at Table 301 Restaurant Group in 2004 with an already impressive twelve years of experience in the industry, which ranged from bartending to positions in management. She became a certified Sommelier in 2007 and since her promotion to Table 301 Beverage Director in 2012, Mahar can be found splitting her time between Greenville’s Mediterranean-themed Lazy Goat and the contemporary Southern comfort of Soby’s.

 

When Santé was looking for Bordeaux recommendations, Mahar went straight to producer Richard Betts’ Saint Glinglin, selecting his 2010 Saint Glinglin Carte Verte and 2011 Saint Glinglin, St Emilion Grand Cru.

 

“I am loving both of these wines from Bordeaux right now, and probably always will,” she told Santé. “Betts told me back in the spring that, ‘wine should be a grocery, not a luxury’ and has made good on that promise.”

 

“His Carte Verte is not a blend, but resurrects the varietal of Merlot to those who have ignored it for the last 10 years. Its combination of fruit and earth takes it to a different level then one would expect for a Merlot. Bett’s concept and decision to blend the Cabernet Franc with the Merlot in his Grand Cru brings multiple levels of surprise to this wine from the nose, to the first taste, and as you continue to drink it. The experience is complex and delightful.”

 

2010 Saint Glinglin Carte Verte
From the Francs Cotes de Bordeaux. It is made of 100% Merlot and is vinified in cement vats. it's plummy, polished and lightly toasted, with an engaging, juicy profile and light tug of earth on the finish. What is even more incredible about this wine is that the fruit is sourced from Château Puygueraud and Château Peyroutas, and the bottle is priced retail at $20.

 

2011 Saint Glinglin, St Emilion Grand Cru
70% Merlot and 30% Cabernet Franc, the blend is fleshy, with lots of dark plum fruit and a solid layer of sweet toast that's integrated but will need a year to unwind fully. There's a nice strong tug of clay on the finish too, for added grip. The fruit is sourced from Château Larcis Ducasse and Château Trimoulet. It retails at $35.

 

“Both of these wines are so approachable for Bordeaux, that I could drink them and enjoy them without food. It makes me feel good that we are seeing Bordeaux in a good way, a new way, and Richard Betts is making sure of it.”

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