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Articles in "Wine"

“The most important lesson I learned when I passed the Master of Wine exam is that wine can never truly be mastered.”

Over the past twenty years, Chilean wineries and winemakers have been discovering new and interesting terroir and microclimates. Among these areas are the two of the most Southern-reaching areas of Chile, the Malleco and Bío Bío Valleys.

Today, more and more chefs and sommeliers, as well as consumers, are looking for organic wines. The terrific news is that there is an ever-increasing selection of naturally produced wines from which to choose.

When consumers choose Piedmont wines, they are not just getting good quality, they are experiencing part of a history and a culture developed around a beautiful land.

Spain has great wine and great values, especially from regions that have been under the radar here in the US, and once these regions are more recognized for the quality that they offer, you can expect their notoriety and demand to grow.

Piemonte Land of Perfection Grand Tasting Event was held on July 18th 2012, in New York City.

Aconcagua, though small, is well-recognized as one of Chile’s premier regions for wine-growing with a prominent past helping to set the wines of Chile on the map.

Reaching far to the north of Chile are the Limari and Elqui Valleys whose climate, despite being so close to the equator, are classified as cool climate growing areas.

Maule is Chile’s largest winegrowing region, with over 31 thousand hectares under vine, and is also one of country’s oldest and most diverse valleys.

“Piemonte Land of Perfection” invites you to experience the fruits of this distinctive climate and to meet the artisans dedicated to making wines representative of its beauty.

The area of San Antonio was once primarily a shipping port known for its seafood, not produce, but in recent years, the valley has made itself known as one of Chile’s most expressive cool climate wine regions.

If you want a nice range of excellent wines, drop everything and call J Vineyards.

Almaviva winery began in 1997 when the Baroness Philippine de Rothschild recognized the potential of Chilean terroir and entered into an agreement with Don Eduardo Guilisasti Tagle, Chairman of Concha y Toro, a premier Chilean producer.

Nestled in the center of the Central Valley are two valleys Colchagua and Cachapoal, that, together, make up the Rapel Valley. 

With lamb, fish, and lighter fare supplanting hearty deep-winter food, Pinot Noir becomes the obvious choice for pairing with almost any dish.

As was the case with the 2008 vintage, the jumbled weather in 2011 had all the right elements – sunshine, rain, heat, cold – in all the wrong places, thus gathering early predictions of gloom.

According to Native American legend, the lakes in upper New York State were created when the Great Spirit placed a hand down on earth in a blessing that left an imprint of the sacred fingers on the land. 

True luxe and flagellation at the 2012 World of Pinot Noir:  American Pinot Noir has definitely grown up, but have Pinot Noir lovers matured?

 Never has the world produced so many quality wines in so many different countries. Consequently, a beverage director/sommelier has more options to choose from than ever before.

Soil mates Dry Creek Valley and Zinfandel, after an extended co-habitation of more than a century, to officially declare their somewhat-undivided devotion to each other.

Today’s emerging wine consumers do not follow yesterday’s guidelines or taste preferences.

A tasting of 10 wines with perfect ratings at this weekend's MidAtlantic Food + Wine Feast in Wilmington, DE, shows that not only the Oscars deserve a red-carpet walk.

Many Bordeaux wine families have branched out in recent years with estates in Chile and Argentina.  For Jean-Jacques Bonnie, winegrowing is universal in philosophy, if different in practice.