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Clairet - not 'claret' - from Bordeaux can combine the best qualities of a red and a pink.

Accessing a wine’s relative level of excellence happens at the point of tasting, while the quality of wine will result from its development and processing from grape to glass.

Is your restaurant missing out on opportunities to profit from beer? Far too many operations offer a narrow range of beers that barely differ in flavor. Yet quality beer ranges as widely in style and is as food friendly as wine.

Over the course of my travels, I chat with restaurateurs and hear the latest hot industry topics. Recently, much of the talk has been about screw caps and how to deal with them. This column addresses the presentation of screw-capped wines on the list. We will also explore ways to present a screw-capped bottle of wine with as much integrity and ceremony as those closed with corks.

Sardinia is actually where Vermentino reaches it’s fullest expression due to the climate and soil. You can find it in two styles – one is fresh and vibrant, with crisp acidity. And the other is more structured and complex, with time spent on the lees.

Since Danny Meyer’s announcement about his no-tipping policy, restaurateurs around the country have been sitting up and taking notice.

Why don't more restaurants give cooking classes to lure customers?

Though there is some industry in the vicinity of its largest city, Bari, a countryside patched together with vineyards, olive groves, and fields of wheat testifies to Apulia’s most important products.

Although chef and food service uniforms are steeped in tradition, today's chef uniforms are anything but customary. Gone are the 19th century chef whites, as they are replaced by looks that reflect modern needs, individual personality, and branding.

Some thoughts on giving your fork and knife a rest.

Everyone has a favorite coffee shop in Manhattan. We each like to think ours is somehow better than everyone else’s, as if we would not be seen in any other spot. I doubt there is a single best coffee shop; there are too many great coffee places in New York (think Eddie Murphy grinning while showing off the “world’s best coffee” in Coming To America). That said Irving Farm is my favorite shop on the Upper West Side and the company from which I buy all of my coffee; it has become a second home to me.

The latest Nebbiolo releases have arrived. Here’s an up close look at 2011 and 2012 Barolo, Barbaresco and Roero at historic and innovative wineries in the Alba area.

Before reading, take a guess where the Okanagen is. Pat yourself on the back if you are correct.

      A lifetime ago, or so it seems, I tended bar in the White Elephant, an iconic resort hotel on the island of Nantucket. This was the beginning of my interest and education into the world of wine and spirits.

St. Francis is targeting its Reserve Tier reds at the $100 mark on steak house and white table cloth wine lists. 

At once beguilingly sweet and juicy, with a kiss of tartness, cherries are seduction on a stem. And the fruit’s appeal is only enhanced by its limited availability within a season that lasts just a few weeks in most locales, and less than three months overall across the country. Although most other fruits are now predictable fixtures in the food supply, the cherry’s appearance marks a moment for restaurants to enjoy—and exploit—one of nature’s special treats.

For the next few weeks I am going to highlight some of my favorite restaurants in my neighborhood on the Upper West Side.  Even though I have not been writing about it, I have probably eaten enough for a month’s worth of posts, so I have some catching up to do now that it’s summer time.  To begin: Jacob’s Pickles.

Vinho Verde is both a DOC of Portugal and a  wine type, ideal for the coming months. Find out why.

Many spirits enthusiasts not only are embracing the classic brands and styles but also are seeking out new tastes, often presented in cocktails made from an ever-increasing and dazzling medley of ingredients. To capitalize on these trends, suppliers have concocted a genuinely innovative and exciting generation of original spirits.

It is no secret that business is bubbling for Italy’s Prosecco producers. Total Prosecco sales here in the U.S. now easily surpass Champagne sales and are still growing at a 25% clip.  With a friendly, fruit-forward profile, lower alcohol content and moderate price tag, more and more customers are choosing to forego traditional Champagne and order Prosecco instead. It seems that Prosecco has carved out its own niche, a bubbly with a more informal, sprezzatura image, bucking the conventional notion of formality, celebration and splurge. In fact, along with a smaller, but undeniable Cava resurgence, Proseccos have boosted sparkling wine consumption in the U.S. by nearly 50% in less than a decade.

At a handful of restaurant bars around the country, you’re likely to find the bartender in the kitchen—well before prime bar time—using a Vita-Prep or a Cryovac. He or she may be taring a laboratory scale to weigh out precise amounts of gelatin or xanthan. or maybe the bartender is rolling out a liquid-nitrogen tank to perform a spherification or clarification technique for a component of a libation in progress. What’s going on here?

Pierre and Helene Seillan are part of the unfolding, but still incomplete, saga of generational transfer.

Americans love lamb, but they rarely prepare it at home. Perhaps because it is more expensive than other red meats or because of its traditional reputation as a food reserved for holidays, Americans have left cooking lamb largely to the restaurant experts. It’s not surprising that 75 percent of white tablecloth restaurants feature some kind of lamb on the menu.