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Food

The Only Saucepan You Need

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 27, 2020 - 8:58pm
A new pot from Food52 has all the features a cook needs, with a slightly rounded silhouette for better stirring.
Categories: Food

Take a Deep Dive Into Spanish Cuisine

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 27, 2020 - 8:53pm
“Delicioso,” a scholarly history, looks at Spanish food from prehistory to Ferran Adrià.
Categories: Food

Vegan Soups Ready to Reheat

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 27, 2020 - 8:46pm
Good Stock, which has a cafe in the West Village, now sells its vegan and vegetarian soups online.
Categories: Food

An Ode to Manhattan’s Chinatown

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 27, 2020 - 8:44pm
In celebration of the Lunar New Year, a pop-up store celebrates Chinatown with art.
Categories: Food

Drink Like a Coppola on Oscar Night

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 27, 2020 - 8:41pm
Francis Ford Coppola is selling the wines Oscar winners may be sipping at the Governor’s Ball.
Categories: Food

The Spotted Pig, Where Employees Were Sexually Harassed, Closes

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 27, 2020 - 6:00pm
The West Village restaurant has shuttered just weeks after its owner, Ken Friedman, agreed to a monetary settlement with 11 former employees.
Categories: Food

Best Super Bowl Recipes: Wings, Chili and More

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 27, 2020 - 5:02pm
All the recipes you need for your viewing party.
Categories: Food

Moo Shu, Now With Less Meat

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 27, 2020 - 4:32pm
Faced with a glut of mushrooms, J. Kenji López-Alt added them to a classic Joyce Chen recipe. The result? Tasty, and alliterative.
Categories: Food

The Most Delicious Cold Candied Oranges

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 27, 2020 - 10:30am
Gabrielle Hamilton has a beautiful new recipe for fresh, firm seedless oranges poached in a light sugar syrup. Make it soon.
Categories: Food

What to Cook This Week

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 26, 2020 - 10:30am
Slide into the week with an easy, earthy lentil soup from Melissa Clark, Alison Roman’s whole fish or an endlessly adaptable big salad with grains.
Categories: Food

How a Designer Learned to Cook Using Memory Alone

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 24, 2020 - 3:47pm
When Phillip Lim finally decided to put his kitchen to use, he followed his nose back to the fragrant dishes of his childhood.
Categories: Food

Frieda Caplan, Who Enlivened the Produce Aisle, Dies at 96

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 24, 2020 - 3:16pm
She helped introduce kiwi, jicama and countless other unfamiliar fruits and vegetables to American consumers.
Categories: Food

Bright Flavors for Dreary Days

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 24, 2020 - 2:01pm
Three-cup vegetables, a creamy farro with mushrooms, and fried eggs with garlicky green rice: Let these meals jolt awake your urge to cook.
Categories: Food

This Fish Is as Easy as Dinner Gets

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 24, 2020 - 11:05am
Sizzling, melted butter makes the base for an extremely quick, garlicky pan sauce for fish.
Categories: Food

It’s a Cheese Marathon

Planet Cheese - January 21, 2020 - 9:23pm

One of these years, I’m going to take a clicker to the Winter Fancy Food Show so I can count exactly how many cheeses I sampled. Sixty? Seventy? My self-discipline melts like hot mozzarella at this three-day extravaganza. I’m looking for trends and the next big stars, so I soldier on. Eighty cheeses?

This year I spotted a lot of wheels coated with dried herbs, flowers and spices—perhaps inspired by the success of Alp Blossom the German phenom. Be on the lookout for Ghiotto (above right), a delicate bloomy-rind goat’s milk disk cloaked in calendula petals from Italian affineur Cora Formaggi. Ghiotto means delicious, and that’s as good a description as any.

Capriole Julianna, an aged goat cheese coated in herbes de Provence, safflower petals and calendula petals, predates Alp Blossom by several years. It is my favorite of this Indiana producer’s cheeses, and it was as mellow, creamy, and herbaceous as ever when I had it at an event preceding the show.

Wildflower, from German producer Baldauf, is an Alp Blossom lookalike. Baldauf is just securing U.S. distribution so we should soon see more of its fine alpine cheeses.

Water-buffalo cheeses are on the march, and I was smitten by those from Australian cheesemaker Kris Lloyd. Her Persian Feta with buffalo milk, a fresh cheese packed in oil with herbs, is silky and spreadable. It’s not feta, despite the name, but it would certainly be at home in a salad with tomatoes, cucumbers, and olives. Lloyd also produces a similar cheese with camel’s milk (top left), a bit leaner in taste but still luscious. Wild camels are a growing problem in Australia’s outback, and the government is culling them. Lloyd hopes that developing cheeses made with their milk will spare some of these animals.

Guffanti’s raw-milk Robiola di Roccaverano was a revelation for me. Guffanti has modified the recipe and aging procedure to slow the ripening of this Italian goat cheese so it can last 60 days (the minimum required by the FDA) and still have some lifespan when it arrives in the U.S. Without that tweaking, this classic robiola would be an only-in-Italy experience. At the show, it was mushroomy, yeasty and perfectly ripe.

Also from Italy, the Taleggio Bergamasco from importer Forever Cheese made a big impression. Unlike conventional Taleggio, which has a moist, tacky rind from multiple brine washes, the Bergamasco version is washed only once, then allowed to develop a natural rind. It delivers all the beefy, earthy, saline flavor of traditional Taleggio…and then some.

Forever Cheese also had three superb aged sheep cheeses that I hope merchants will embrace: Urepel from France’s Basque region, El Abuelo Ruperto from Spain and Regginella d’Abruzzo from Italy. Retailers, we want these!

I’ve been a fan of Casa Forcello mostarda (made by Le Tamerici) since visiting the facility near Mantova several years ago. These chunky fruit preserves, scented with spicy mustard oil, are sublime with aged sheep cheeses, blue cheeses and Taleggio. The company’s new Orange & Chocolate Mostarda put my conservative taste to the test, but I’m a believer now.

NEW! 2020 World Cheese Tour Classes Announced

Please join me for the ninth year of the World Cheese Tour, a monthly series of guided cheese tastings at the beautiful Silverado Cooking School in Napa. You’ll find new class themes this year and, as always, many new cheeses. I rarely repeat a cheese! Come learn more about Spanish cheeses, raw-milk rockstars, or cheese and wine pairing. Find the complete schedule here.

Categories: Food

Where Age Is the Thing: Rioja Gran Reserva

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 16, 2020 - 1:54pm
It’s a wine that seems archaic these days, but with a price worthy of exploration, it offers textures and flavors that are not so easy to come by.
Categories: Food

Always Something New

Planet Cheese - January 14, 2020 - 11:00am

Recently, a young man in one of my classes asked me how many cheeses there were. Like…how many in ALL? Who could know? Thousands, surely. All I know is that I keep stumbling on new ones, or at least new to me, like this totally loveable goat cheese from northern Italy. I’m crazy for it on its own, but I intend to drape slices on hot polenta at the next opportunity.

The importer, Fresca Italia, calls it Soffice di Capra and began bringing it to the U.S. last summer. It’s a made-up name. You won’t find such a cheese in any reference books. Soffice (SOFF-ee-chay), Italian for soft, describes the tender, delicate, open texture, which, for me, is the cheese’s most compelling feature. Others have described it as similar to Brie or Camembert, but Soffice is nothing like those two French classics. A more accurate comparison—equivalent, really—would be Scimudin, a little-known Lombardy cheese made with cow’s milk, goat’s milk or both.

Soffice di Capra is produced in a small village near Bergamo from pasteurized milk. The importer won’t say who makes it because competition in this realm can be ruthless. Importers have been known to poach each other’s suppliers.

Made in a four-pound square and matured for only about 12 days at the creamery, Soffice di Capra travels to the U.S. by air. Barring delays, it should reach cheese counters well before it’s a month old. I would try to buy it as young as possible and eat it as soon as you can. That moist, airy freshness is a big part of its charm.

Soffice has a thin bloomy rind, like Brie, but the similarities stop there. It has a faint milky aroma, a bit lactic like crème fraiche, but this cheese is not about the aroma. Get it in your mouth. It is moist and creamy, pleasantly tart, a little lemony and perfectly salted.

It is just what I want on an antipasto platter with paper-thin salumi and olives. Slice it and crack some black pepper over it, if you like. A bottle of Arneis, Pinot Grigio, Tocai Friulano or Grüner Veltliner would be ideal with this light, bright, subtle cheese.

Look for Soffice di Capra in Northern California at Andy’s Produce (Sebastopol), Atelier by JCB (Yountville), Big John’s (Healdsburg), Davis Food Co-op (Davis), Gus’s Market (SF), Market Hall Foods (Berkeley and Oakland), Noriega Produce (SF), Oliver’s Market (multiple Sonoma County locations), Oxbow Cheese (Napa), The Rind (Sacramento), Sacramento Natural Foods, Say Cheese (SF), Staff of Life (Santa Cruz) and Sunshine Foods (St. Helena).

NEW! 2020 World Cheese Tour Classes Announced

Please join me for the ninth year of the World Cheese Tour, a monthly series of guided cheese tastings at the beautiful Silverado Cooking School in Napa. You’ll find new class themes this year and, as always, many new cheeses. I rarely repeat a cheese! Come learn more about Spanish cheeses, raw-milk rockstars, or cheese and wine pairing. Find the complete schedule here.

Categories: Food

How Jean-Georges Vongerichten Went From ‘No Good’ Kid to 4-Star Chef

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 14, 2020 - 5:00am
The globally prolific chef started out as a small-town truant and troublemaker. Then he got to work.
Categories: Food

Hotels Ramp Up Their Wine-Tourism Experiences

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 14, 2020 - 5:00am
‘With so many lodging choices, wine programs offer companies another way to stand out.’
Categories: Food

Matty Maher, an Institution at an Institution, McSorley’s, Dies at 80

NYTimes Dining and Wine - January 13, 2020 - 7:00pm
As bartender, manager and owner, he helped the East Village saloon survive neighborhood blight and change its ways by admitting women and banning smoking.
Categories: Food