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Food

Le Crocodile Shows How a New York Brasserie Should Look and Taste

NYTimes Dining and Wine - March 3, 2020 - 2:00pm
The new restaurant in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, has a menu that goes on and on. Nearly everything on it makes you want to come back for more.
Categories: Food

How Do They Make Plant-Based Meat Behave Like Beef?

NYTimes Dining and Wine - March 3, 2020 - 1:43pm
J. Kenji López-Alt explains the science behind the new vegan products.
Categories: Food

Peak, With 101st-Floor Views, Opens in Hudson Yards

NYTimes Dining and Wine - March 3, 2020 - 1:34pm
An American brasserie in Long Island City, Vietnamese in Williamsburg, and more restaurant news.
Categories: Food

Marmalade With a Moroccan Touch

NYTimes Dining and Wine - March 3, 2020 - 12:03pm
Brins, a jam company from Brooklyn, makes a lemon-saffron marmalade.
Categories: Food

Your Cheese Dreams Come True

Planet Cheese - March 3, 2020 - 12:00pm

California fresh: Nicasio Valley Cheese Foggy Morning

Can I brag on my state? California is about to host its 14th annual Artisan Cheese Festival, a three-day event that just keeps getting better. (I have perfect attendance.) Cheese fans: Your dreams can come true here. Want to step inside the aging cellars of an artisan Cheddar producer? Or visit three super-hip craft distillers? (There will be cheese. And a driver.) Want to meet the latest rock-star cheesemaker? (Hint: She’s not old enough to vote.)

This year’s California Artisan Cheese Festival is Friday, March 27, through Sunday, March 29, and the entire schedule of activities is online. My advice: Take a farm tour on Friday, sign up for an educational seminar on Saturday and come hungry to the walk-around festival in Santa Rosa on Sunday.

Some highlights:

Visit Bivalve Dairy in Petaluma, a longtime supplier of cow’s milk to Cowgirl Creamery, now making its own cheeses. I’m looking forward to trying its Foundry Fresh cheese and Mendonça, a Portuguese-style aged wheel.

Supernova: Shooting Star Creamery’s Avery Jones

Tour Wm. Cofield Cheesemakers in Sebastopol, a Cheddar producer that doesn’t typically open its creamery and aging room to the public.

Meet Avery Jones of Shooting Star Creamery, the 16-year-old wunderkind whose sheep cheese took third place at last year’s American Cheese Society competition. She’s bringing that cheese (Aries) and two other new sheep cheeses to the Festival marketplace on Sunday.

On Saturday, I’ll be leading a tasting of cheeses paired with a beverage I could drink every night: the elegant sparkling wines of Roederer Estate. Three of them! Winemaker Arnaud Weyrich will join me. If you’re not yet convinced that bubbles are the most versatile wine for cheese, well, be there.

A portion of ticket sales goes to local agriculture-related nonprofits. So far, the festival has raised $135,000 for these worthy causes.

Cheese Class: Raw-Milk Cheese Showcase

Wednesday, April 15
Silverado Cooking School
Napa
5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Reserve

We’ll celebrate tradition in this class devoted to cheeses made exclusively with raw milk. For many purist cheesemakers, in the U.S. and abroad, working with full-flavored, unpasteurized milk is non-negotiable. Come taste some standouts.

Categories: Food

Turn to Jackfruit for a Vegan Snack

NYTimes Dining and Wine - March 2, 2020 - 7:52pm
Seril’s Chakka Chips are made from the tree fruit, which is lightly fried in coconut oil.
Categories: Food

The Art of Japanese Sweets-Making

NYTimes Dining and Wine - March 2, 2020 - 7:51pm
Kajitsu hosts a wagashi-maker from Kyoto for an event celebrating spring.
Categories: Food

For Good Gouda, Head to the Subway

NYTimes Dining and Wine - March 2, 2020 - 7:42pm
A new vendor at Turnstyle, in the Columbus Circle station, sells a rainbow of Dutch cheese flavors.
Categories: Food

The Secrets of a Catskills Diner

NYTimes Dining and Wine - March 2, 2020 - 7:40pm
The tasty history of the Phoenicia Diner is recounted, with recipes, in a new cookbook.
Categories: Food

Giving Rosso di Montalcino a Second Look

NYTimes Dining and Wine - March 2, 2020 - 1:45pm
This Tuscan sangiovese wine can be more muscular than its cousin, Chianti Classico. But a recent tasting found the latest vintages to be inconsistent.
Categories: Food

Put Your Ax Into It, at This Los Angeles Restaurant

NYTimes Dining and Wine - March 2, 2020 - 1:10pm
Mo’s House of Axe brings together tools, beer and barbecue.
Categories: Food

She’s Gotta Have It

Planet Cheese - February 25, 2020 - 12:00pm

When I posted about cacio e pepe recently, I didn’t realize I was headed down a rabbit hole. I like this dish—pasta with pecorino romano and black pepper—but I’m not obsessed with it. Then I discovered someone who is. Her Instagram, cacioepepelove, has 6,600 followers and climbing. I took one look and couldn’t stop looking. Every day, a new cacio e pepe. Who was behind this funny, mouthwatering, passionate love letter to a pasta dish?

Jessica Roffe (above) works for the University of Maryland by day and curates her quirky page in the off hours. Initially, the 29-year-old posted images from her own dining adventures, but then the floodgates opened. The tantalizing bowls of cacio e pepe on her Instagram now come from restaurants and amateur cooks everywhere. Roffe is never judgmental, although she has firm opinions about the right way to prepare this tricky dish. (She made the version pictured above left.) Check out her own recipe on her Instagram stories for pointers. I spoke to her recently by phone.

Roffe. Sounds Italian.

I like to think I’m Italian but I’m not. I studied abroad in Florence for four months, but I think I had my first cacio e pepe in Siena. I went to this restaurant almost every night for two weeks. I became obsessed. I’m a picky eater, and cacio e pepe is really simple.

How did the Instagram start?

Cacio e pepe started blowing up in America, and I was looking to see if there were any Instagrams dedicated to it. I thought it would be a fun hobby. I’ve gotten really positive feedback. People message me and say, “Your page has made my life.”

Secret no more: Roma Sparita’s cacio e pepe

Most memorable cacio e pepe?

When I visited Rome, a friend took me to Roma Sparita. They serve cacio e pepe in a fried Parmigiano shell, and that was life changing. (She’s talking about frico, the lacy cheese crisps.) The restaurant was on “No Reservations,” Anthony Bourdain’s show, but he didn’t want the secret out, so he didn’t mention the restaurant’s name.

Any estimate of how many different versions of cacio e pepe you’ve eaten?

My husband would probably say too many. I’m trying to get all the D.C. places checked off my list.

Do you prefer to make it or to eat it in restaurants?

I’m a bit of a snob now. I know the right way to do it, so I’m very particular. A lot of places will put butter or oil in it, but it’s just three ingredients (pasta, pepper, cheese). Whole Foods came out with a cacio e pepe sauce in a jar and the first ingredient was cream. I thought, I’m not even gonna try this. There’s no cream in cacio e pepe. We got a pasta attachment for our KitchenAid, so we’ve been trying to make it at home on Friday nights.

How would you describe the perfect cacio e pepe?

It has just the right amount of creaminess, which comes only from the pecorino mixed with pasta water. It should have really fresh cracked pepper. It shouldn’t be watery—no liquid underneath. You have to use the right amount of pasta water to soak up the cheese.

And what’s the right pasta?

When I first had it, it was pici, like thick spaghetti or bucatini. But people make it with everything these days. I’ve seen it made with mafalde. At Left Bank, in New York, they use a curly pasta. I’ve been trying to go there.

Can you play around with the pepper? Green peppercorns? Pink peppercorns?

I got a recipe recently with four peppercorns and I do want to try that.

Any do’s and don’ts?

I crush the peppercorn with a mallet. A lot of people use Parmigiano Reggiano but it’s just supposed to have pecorino. It melts better. You have to put the cheese in gradually or it will clump. People get feisty on Instagram. The only negative comments I ever get are from Italians. The other day, I posted a cacio e pepe that had lemon in it, and somebody said, “Real cacio e pepe doesn’t have lemon,” and I’m like, I know, I’m just trying to show variety. People are very serious about this.

Any other crimes against cacio e pepe?

People don’t know how to pronounce it. (Say cotch-o eh peh peh.) That makes me laugh. A lot of people call it elevated mac and cheese but that’s another misconception. I’m not a fan of mac and cheese.

Have you been back to Rome for cacio e pepe?

I’m going back this summer, but I won’t have much time there. I have to pick one restaurant. I’ve been struggling, but I’ve got it down to two: Roscioli and Da Ottello.

What do you like to drink with it?

Red wine. Anything Italian is good.

How long can you keep this going?

I’ve been thinking about that. I try to post every two days, but we’ll see how long I can keep that up.

Cheese Class: Raw-Milk Cheese Showcase

Wednesday, April 15
Silverado Cooking School
Napa
5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Reserve

We’ll celebrate tradition in this class devoted to cheeses made exclusively with raw milk. For many purist cheesemakers, in the U.S. and abroad, working with full-flavored, unpasteurized milk is non-negotiable. Come taste some standouts.

Categories: Food

Everybody Goes to Burger Heaven

NYTimes Dining and Wine - February 25, 2020 - 10:18am
A Manhattan lunch counter where Jackie O. ate with John-John and Holly Golightly met Sally Tomato’s bagman bids a final farewell.
Categories: Food

Is There Such a Thing as a ‘Sugar High’?

NYTimes Dining and Wine - February 25, 2020 - 2:08am
Many parents blame sugar for their children’s hyperactive behavior. But the myth has been debunked.
Categories: Food

A New Way to Lure Luxury Buyers: Celebrity Chefs on Site

NYTimes Dining and Wine - February 25, 2020 - 1:12am
In Dubai, a new development will feature restaurants run by three acclaimed chefs, reflecting a new mixture of culinary and residential marketing.
Categories: Food

For That PB and J, a Pecan Butter

NYTimes Dining and Wine - February 24, 2020 - 7:18pm
Sunday Provisions has created a new line of earthy, flavored nut butters made with pecans.
Categories: Food

Putting the Fried in Fried Rice

NYTimes Dining and Wine - February 24, 2020 - 7:05pm
The secret to crisp, crunchy rice? Stir less, fry more.
Categories: Food

How to Serve Fonio

NYTimes Dining and Wine - February 24, 2020 - 5:45pm
A cookbook from the chef Pierre Thiam offers a guide to making this African grain.
Categories: Food

A Food Conference Heads to Pittsburgh

NYTimes Dining and Wine - February 24, 2020 - 5:44pm
The International Association of Culinary Professionals will hold its annual gathering in Pennsylvania.
Categories: Food

More Chip in Levain’s Cookie

NYTimes Dining and Wine - February 24, 2020 - 5:36pm
The bakery is introducing the “two chip” cookie for the opening of its NoHo store.
Categories: Food